Filings






Q&A

1. What was announced by Entergy and Holtec on November 16, 2018?

The two companies jointly filed a License Transfer Application, requesting approval for the transfer of Pilgrim, as well as its Nuclear Decommissioning Trust Fund, from Entergy to Holtec after the plant permanently shuts down by June 1, 2019, along with detailed separate filings that lay out the process each would use to decommission the facility. The companies have asked the NRC to approve the application by May 31, 2019, to facilitate a transaction closing by the end of 2019. In addition to the jointly filed LTA, the separate filings by each company include:

  • Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report - A description, schedule and cost estimate of planned decommissioning activities.
  • Decommissioning Cost Estimate – A study estimating the costs to decommission a nuclear plant, including labor, fuel and disposal fees.
  • Commingled Fund Exemption Request – A request to allow the Nuclear Decommissioning Trust Fund to be used for spent fuel management and site restoration.
  • Entergy will also submit an Updated Spent Fuel Management Plan, which describes how Pilgrim intends to fund and manage all spent nuclear fuel until it is transferred to the U.S. Department of Energy for ultimate disposal.
2. What is Holtec’s plan and timing to decommission Pilgrim?

Holtec’s filings describe the plan of its subsidiary, Holtec Decommissioning International, to complete the dismantling, decontamination, and remediation of Pilgrim to NRC standards within eight years of license transfer, or by the end of 2027, assuming timely regulatory approvals. Holtec’s process achieves site restoration decades sooner than if Entergy retained the plant while meeting all applicable local, state and federal regulations.

Holtec’s technical expertise, innovations, and industry-leading experience in spent fuel management and decommissioning enable it to do the work in a more cost-effective manner than Entergy, with uncompromised safety and under rigorous NRC oversight.

3. Why did Holtec and Entergy file separate Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports (PSDARs), Decommissioning Cost Estimates (DCE) and other associated regulatory filings?

The regulatory filings explain how each company would dismantle the plant, decontaminate the facility, and remediate the site to NRC standards. If the NRC approves the license transfer and the transaction closes, the Holtec submittals will govern the site’s decommissioning. The Entergy submittals will govern Pilgrim’s decommissioning if Entergy remains the plant owner and operator.

4. When can I access the filings?

The filings (minus redacted proprietary information) are posted to Pilgrim’s website, PilgrimPower.com.

5. How is Holtec able to decommission Pilgrim for less cost than Entergy?

Holtec’s process achieves site restoration decades sooner than if Entergy retained the plant. Holtec’s technical expertise, innovations, and industry-leading experience in spent fuel management and decommissioning enable it to do the work in a more cost-effective manner than Entergy, safely and under rigorous NRC oversight.

6. How can I find out more about Holtec Decommissioning International?